6 Reasons Your E-bike Motor Should be 500W or Less | EBIKEBC
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Less is More: 6 Reasons Your E-bike Motor Should be 500W or Less

Nearly every retail electric bicycle and ebike conversion kit is listed at a specific power level, such as a “500 watt electric bike” or a “250 watt ebike conversion kit”, yet often this power rating is misleading. You may ask: how big a motor do I need for an ebike?!

When it comes to choosing a motor for your e-bike, bigger isn’t always better. Traditional motors range from 250W-500W, but as the e-bike industry grows, so is motor power. High powered motors are available ranging from 1000W-6000W  but the question is- could less actually be more? Are there advantages to this upgrade in power? And lastly, how much power do you actually need?

When choosing a motor, there are two important factors. How much you weigh, and the terrain you’ll be riding on. A 250w motor is sufficient for general commutes, while upgrading to a 350W or 500W is beneficial for those who will be doing a lot of uphill rides. To put it in perspective, 6000W motors are appropriate for motorbike racing, and are not designed to be contained to city roads.

Generally speaking, for the average person an efficiently designed e-bike provides more than enough power at 500w or less. In fact, increasing the watts on your e-bike comes with disadvantages. Before we dig into the downside of high-powered motors, it’s important to keep in mind that standard by-laws usually cap motor power at 500w. These regulations came into play based on engineering principles and safety.

 

Why your motor should be 500w or less:

  • In Canadian provinces, most e-bikes are limited to 500W output and cannot travel faster than 32 km/h (20 mph) on motor power alone. However, limiting the wattage of ebike motors doesn’t necessarily limit how powerful they can be. Even though a motor is marked as 250 watts  anyone could connect it to a 48V battery and run 20 amps through the motor to achieve 1,000 watts of power.
  • Using a bigger motor means using a bigger battery to travel the same distance. With the battery being the most cost heavy part of an e-bike, this translates into additional savings.
  • Overheating issues can arise when the motor exceeds 1000W. This is seen mostly on long uphill rides, which is one of the reasons people opt for higher watt motors.
  • Motors under 500w have been extensively tested and mass produced. These motors have not only proven to be efficacious but due to the research, they are extremely reliable.
  • The excess power provided by motors exceeding 1000W has negative consequences in the event of a crash. Severity and risk of injury increases linearly with motor power and speed.
  • 750W, 1000W, 3000W and 6000W motor are too heavy for the average street bike, and can cause downstream problems yielding in unnecessary repairs.

Conclusion

Motor power over 750W provides too much power for a street bike and probably should be considered an electrical scooter or some other type of motorized vehicle.

When it comes to choosing the right motor, it ultimately depends on the intentions of the rider. Lower watt motors are low cost, they comply with street legal standards, they are efficient, and don’t come with the downfalls and risk of higher-powered motors. Our consensus: bigger isn’t always better.

45 comments

GiLMaN

GiLMaN

I wanna build one for going to work and its a 10 min ride with car and I want little bit of speed as well
So if I choose the 750 as the middle ground its enough right?

I wanna build one for going to work and its a 10 min ride with car and I want little bit of speed as well
So if I choose the 750 as the middle ground its enough right?

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

750W potentially gets you to 50km/h of speed, however motor winding / battery voltage configuration should be such that be capable of this speed.

750W potentially gets you to 50km/h of speed, however motor winding / battery voltage configuration should be such that be capable of this speed.

Evan

Evan

“Using a bigger motor means using a bigger battery to travel the same distance.”

– Correct me if I’m wrong, but this doesn’t seem true. If you were to travel the same distance at the same speed with a 500 and a 1000 watt motor the battery usage would be the same.

“Using a bigger motor means using a bigger battery to travel the same distance.”

– Correct me if I’m wrong, but this doesn’t seem true. If you were to travel the same distance at the same speed with a 500 and a 1000 watt motor the battery usage would be the same.

Ryan Merrill

Ryan Merrill

What a bunch of BS. First of all, they shouldnt be limiting wattage, they should limit speed. Big Watters bikes have less heat issues, not more. They produce more torque for hills. Big wattage motors are less reliable? Again false. I have 3+ Yeats and 4000kms of riding and still going on my QS 205 v3. I much prefer having big hub and not pushing it that having a small 500w motor and running at its max or past max current in order to climb a steep hill. Big motors require less repairs if your using a hub motor. Last. 6000W is no where near enough for a race bike. Race electric are in the 300KW range.

Everything is about how you program the controller. I have a 32ah battery and can get 65kms ridi g at legal speed with my 24KW setup.

It’s like you wrote the article without experiencing riding on a big motor setup

What a bunch of BS. First of all, they shouldnt be limiting wattage, they should limit speed. Big Watters bikes have less heat issues, not more. They produce more torque for hills. Big wattage motors are less reliable? Again false. I have 3+ Yeats and 4000kms of riding and still going on my QS 205 v3. I much prefer having big hub and not pushing it that having a small 500w motor and running at its max or past max current in order to climb a steep hill. Big motors require less repairs if your using a hub motor. Last. 6000W is no where near enough for a race bike. Race electric are in the 300KW range.

Everything is about how you program the controller. I have a 32ah battery and can get 65kms ridi g at legal speed with my 24KW setup.

It’s like you wrote the article without experiencing riding on a big motor setup

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

No need to argue with a bad language. We are not creating rules, we are not creating basic engineering facts either.

No need to argue with a bad language. We are not creating rules, we are not creating basic engineering facts either.

Michael

Michael

Can a 1000 watt 30 amp hour battery 48 volt be used on a rear 500 watt evike conversion kit .2025 mph is all I’m looking for simply because I usually put a tow trailer behind my bicycle and I need a little power because I’m an elder man at nearly 67 years old this year and of my license have been taken for various reasons other than drugs and alcohol

Can a 1000 watt 30 amp hour battery 48 volt be used on a rear 500 watt evike conversion kit .2025 mph is all I’m looking for simply because I usually put a tow trailer behind my bicycle and I need a little power because I’m an elder man at nearly 67 years old this year and of my license have been taken for various reasons other than drugs and alcohol

eBikeBC Marketing

eBikeBC Marketing

Please send us more details at tech@envodrive.com so we can help you find the right solution for your ebike.

Please send us more details at tech@envodrive.com so we can help you find the right solution for your ebike.

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

Your statement can be true if the 1000W motor runs at the same efficiency as the smaller motor. Normally each motor size has an optimal efficiency working condition based on the rated power. Motors tend to be less efficient when they are too big or too small for the out put power.

Your statement can be true if the 1000W motor runs at the same efficiency as the smaller motor. Normally each motor size has an optimal efficiency working condition based on the rated power. Motors tend to be less efficient when they are too big or too small for the out put power.

John

John

Right, they tend to be less efficient. But not half as efficient. You are just handwaving away how asinine your statement is “Using a bigger motor means using a bigger battery to travel the same distance.”
It MIGHT be a few percentage points less at most.
I really hate when supposed experts are caught in a lie, and they dig the hole deeper.

Right, they tend to be less efficient. But not half as efficient. You are just handwaving away how asinine your statement is “Using a bigger motor means using a bigger battery to travel the same distance.”
It MIGHT be a few percentage points less at most.
I really hate when supposed experts are caught in a lie, and they dig the hole deeper.

eBikeBC Staff

eBikeBC Staff

Did some one here claimed “Half as efficient” here? What lie?
for a better understanding see the efficiency chart at this link:
https://i.stack.imgur.com/QuZng.gif
if you get 500W out of a 1000W rated motor, you probably are running it at a considerably lower efficiency, which means lower range for the same battery.
I really LOVE when readers have a passion to challenge and add to their knowledge.

Did some one here claimed “Half as efficient” here? What lie?
for a better understanding see the efficiency chart at this link:
https://i.stack.imgur.com/QuZng.gif
if you get 500W out of a 1000W rated motor, you probably are running it at a considerably lower efficiency, which means lower range for the same battery.
I really LOVE when readers have a passion to challenge and add to their knowledge.

Chainlink700rt

Chainlink700rt

I rode a 500 watt rated ebike
and a 1000 watt ebike
The 1000 watt ebike outperforms the 500 watt
with flying colors.
When you consider motor sizes, charging rate,
distance, peddling, and weight…..whatever……
That’s when all the fun becomes a headache
and you find yourself debating which of what to use.

I rode a 500 watt rated ebike
and a 1000 watt ebike
The 1000 watt ebike outperforms the 500 watt
with flying colors.
When you consider motor sizes, charging rate,
distance, peddling, and weight…..whatever……
That’s when all the fun becomes a headache
and you find yourself debating which of what to use.

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

You are absolutely right. More power, more fun… but…

You are absolutely right. More power, more fun… but…

Han Johnson

Han Johnson

Using a ebike to and from work i find efficiency to important. The motor rarely runs at 100 % but effiency is often better with high voltage. So you will probably get more out of the same motor running at higher voltage – Take a 250 W 24 V engine – use 48 V battery – and it will be a 500 W motor (lcheck if the engine spec allows for the increased Voltage) When you run the motor cruising – it will be more efficient at 48 V….. When i cruise i am running the motor at between 140 and 200 W.

Using a ebike to and from work i find efficiency to important. The motor rarely runs at 100 % but effiency is often better with high voltage. So you will probably get more out of the same motor running at higher voltage – Take a 250 W 24 V engine – use 48 V battery – and it will be a 500 W motor (lcheck if the engine spec allows for the increased Voltage) When you run the motor cruising – it will be more efficient at 48 V….. When i cruise i am running the motor at between 140 and 200 W.

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

Same motor, higher Voltage will make it increase the maximum rotational speed. It wouldn’t add to the torque.

Same motor, higher Voltage will make it increase the maximum rotational speed. It wouldn’t add to the torque.

Robert Persall

Robert Persall

I want to be able to ride forty miles without recharge. I weigh 200lbs. Would a 750w motor do this. Relatively flat, rail trails

I want to be able to ride forty miles without recharge. I weigh 200lbs. Would a 750w motor do this. Relatively flat, rail trails

Tom

Tom

I weigh 270 lbs. Riding in flat areas with very few hills. Would a 500 size motor be ok?

I weigh 270 lbs. Riding in flat areas with very few hills. Would a 500 size motor be ok?

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

Yes, 500W motor can eliminate about 6-8% of road grade for you

Yes, 500W motor can eliminate about 6-8% of road grade for you

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

500W motor is absolutely enough for 200lbs, range depends on power consumption AND battery capacity; the higher the power the lower the range. A rough estimate for 40 miles, 200lbs, relatively hilly area and 500W motor ebike is that it requires about 800Wh battery. It is considered a high capacity battery in ebike industry. It can be a 48V 17.5Ah battery pack.
If being used mostly flat on 50% pedal assist, you should be good with an average battery too. It all depends on road condition and how you pedal.

500W motor is absolutely enough for 200lbs, range depends on power consumption AND battery capacity; the higher the power the lower the range. A rough estimate for 40 miles, 200lbs, relatively hilly area and 500W motor ebike is that it requires about 800Wh battery. It is considered a high capacity battery in ebike industry. It can be a 48V 17.5Ah battery pack.
If being used mostly flat on 50% pedal assist, you should be good with an average battery too. It all depends on road condition and how you pedal.

Damiano

Damiano

FYI I have a bafang 250w motor on, I joke you not, a 45Ah 58.8v battery pack (literally over 200 18650 batteries. It is controlled with a 48v 2000w speed controller with max p out at 40 amps.

The unit flies. Top speed 58 kmh
Uphill I am getting over 45kmh
I only burn out hall sensors if I do something stupid like climb a 40 degree incline.
And I don’t need to charge it every time I get home. It’s range exceeds 150km on a charge.

Every other size motor I put on the wheels is slower. The over fed 36v 250w rear hub wins.

FYI I have a bafang 250w motor on, I joke you not, a 45Ah 58.8v battery pack (literally over 200 18650 batteries. It is controlled with a 48v 2000w speed controller with max p out at 40 amps.

The unit flies. Top speed 58 kmh
Uphill I am getting over 45kmh
I only burn out hall sensors if I do something stupid like climb a 40 degree incline.
And I don’t need to charge it every time I get home. It’s range exceeds 150km on a charge.

Every other size motor I put on the wheels is slower. The over fed 36v 250w rear hub wins.

Damiano

Damiano

FYI I have a bafang 250w motor on, I joke you not, a 45Ah 58.8v battery pack (literally over 200 18650 batteries. It is controlled with a 48v 2000w speed controller with max p out at 40 amps.

The unit flies. Top speed 58 kmh
Uphill I am getting over 45kmh
I only burn out hall sensors if I do something stupid like climb a 40 degree incline.
And I don’t need to charge it every time I get home. It’s range exceeds 150km on a charge.

Every other size motor I put on the wheels is slower. The over fed 36v 250w rear hub wins.

Sorry forgot to add. I don’t have any pedals on my bike. I do not pedal at all.

FYI I have a bafang 250w motor on, I joke you not, a 45Ah 58.8v battery pack (literally over 200 18650 batteries. It is controlled with a 48v 2000w speed controller with max p out at 40 amps.

The unit flies. Top speed 58 kmh
Uphill I am getting over 45kmh
I only burn out hall sensors if I do something stupid like climb a 40 degree incline.
And I don’t need to charge it every time I get home. It’s range exceeds 150km on a charge.

Every other size motor I put on the wheels is slower. The over fed 36v 250w rear hub wins.

Sorry forgot to add. I don’t have any pedals on my bike. I do not pedal at all.

Singh

Singh

hello Damiano,
I am interested in making a bike just like yours. Can you provide a link or resources where I can find bafang 250 watt motor with 29 inch wheel on, 45Ah 58.8v battery, and 48v 2000w controller please?
question. Your motor and controller are rated for 36v and 48v respectively , can they handle 58.8v?
I look forward to hearing from your soon

hello Damiano,
I am interested in making a bike just like yours. Can you provide a link or resources where I can find bafang 250 watt motor with 29 inch wheel on, 45Ah 58.8v battery, and 48v 2000w controller please?
question. Your motor and controller are rated for 36v and 48v respectively , can they handle 58.8v?
I look forward to hearing from your soon

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

why bafang? why 250W? why 58.8V? Why 45Wh? why 2000W controller? none of your numbers match each other!!!

why bafang? why 250W? why 58.8V? Why 45Wh? why 2000W controller? none of your numbers match each other!!!

Howard

Howard

Very helpful info here. Thanks

I am considering selling my Trek Powerfly 7 eMountian bike and getting a more road oriented bike. I weigh 270 pounds and I am going to ride the new bike on some hills but not on single track and a lot of hills. I’m thinking that 500w might be not enough power and I should go to 750w motor. Maybe the SONDORS Fold XS??

Very helpful info here. Thanks

I am considering selling my Trek Powerfly 7 eMountian bike and getting a more road oriented bike. I weigh 270 pounds and I am going to ride the new bike on some hills but not on single track and a lot of hills. I’m thinking that 500w might be not enough power and I should go to 750w motor. Maybe the SONDORS Fold XS??

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

Firstly, you need to check if 750W is considered street legal where you ride.
Secondly, compare maximum torque at ebike wheel, that is what you need to climb the hills, 500W might be enough if you get around 80Nm+ of peak torque.

Firstly, you need to check if 750W is considered street legal where you ride.
Secondly, compare maximum torque at ebike wheel, that is what you need to climb the hills, 500W might be enough if you get around 80Nm+ of peak torque.

Michel

Michel

I am considering a Senada folding fat tire e bike. I weigh 220 lbs. I am new to biking and live in a hilly area with paved streets and many trails.the Senada is offered in 500 and 1000 watt versions. Which one would best for me?

I am considering a Senada folding fat tire e bike. I weigh 220 lbs. I am new to biking and live in a hilly area with paved streets and many trails.the Senada is offered in 500 and 1000 watt versions. Which one would best for me?

Jg

Jg

Is a 500 watt motor able to carry me over steep hills, inclined as high as 70 degrees

Is a 500 watt motor able to carry me over steep hills, inclined as high as 70 degrees

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

I am pretty sure your 70 degrees is not accurate. it’s about the vertical.
Our 500W geared hub offer 80Nm of peak torque which reduces about 15% grade of any slope for a 200lbs rider.

I am pretty sure your 70 degrees is not accurate. it’s about the vertical.
Our 500W geared hub offer 80Nm of peak torque which reduces about 15% grade of any slope for a 200lbs rider.

Emil

Emil

I ride 250cc scooter and thinking to move to an electric scooter or bike, mainly for riding on streets. Yes, I will have to put a number plate on it
I guess I will need to reach 40 mph on the streets to stay safe from cars on traffic lights. What power bike should I choose? Also, what else should I consider? Maybe stronger frame, better breaks, motorcycle protective equipment? Thanks

I ride 250cc scooter and thinking to move to an electric scooter or bike, mainly for riding on streets. Yes, I will have to put a number plate on it
I guess I will need to reach 40 mph on the streets to stay safe from cars on traffic lights. What power bike should I choose? Also, what else should I consider? Maybe stronger frame, better breaks, motorcycle protective equipment? Thanks

EbikeBC

EbikeBC

40mph (64Kmph) on a heavier chassis would require 2KW+ power for a reasonable maneuverability. To supply that power you need a big battery pack of 2-3KWh. your ebike should be more than 100lbs and is not going to cost you less than 3K for the battery, motor and other electrical parts.

40mph (64Kmph) on a heavier chassis would require 2KW+ power for a reasonable maneuverability. To supply that power you need a big battery pack of 2-3KWh. your ebike should be more than 100lbs and is not going to cost you less than 3K for the battery, motor and other electrical parts.

Louys

Louys

As one with not an iota of mechanical/electrical sense my concern is bike power relative to charger power.
The grandson has a toy Chinese ebike 150 watts power. The Led reads 15 bars. Each full charge only charges 12 bars no matter how long its charged. Does this mean the charger provides “less” power than called for?

I’m thinking on an E-Bike with 500 watts? Must the charger power provide 500 watts or more?

As one with not an iota of mechanical/electrical sense my concern is bike power relative to charger power.
The grandson has a toy Chinese ebike 150 watts power. The Led reads 15 bars. Each full charge only charges 12 bars no matter how long its charged. Does this mean the charger provides “less” power than called for?

I’m thinking on an E-Bike with 500 watts? Must the charger power provide 500 watts or more?

eBikebc

eBikebc

Charger should match the battery Voltage. there is no such term charger power unless we talk about how quick we want the battery be charged. Not charging more than 12/15 bars could be because of weakened battery cells and have no cure other than replacing battery pack.
When you buy a Li-Ion battery operated product it comes with a standard charger. you can only use that charger.

Charger should match the battery Voltage. there is no such term charger power unless we talk about how quick we want the battery be charged. Not charging more than 12/15 bars could be because of weakened battery cells and have no cure other than replacing battery pack.
When you buy a Li-Ion battery operated product it comes with a standard charger. you can only use that charger.

Robin Goodwin

Robin Goodwin

I am 70 now… want to get back to cycling for transport and health sake. I am light…. 65kg but need to tow my dog in a trailer…. he is 30kg + trailer weight. Not going far …. 15 miles max but hills are steep. ( 15% in places, one at 25% for 50 metres). What optimum size of motor please. I know that 250w isn’t enough based on a friends experience. Ps… going to convert one of my mountain bikes that hasn’t been used in a good while . Many thanks

I am 70 now… want to get back to cycling for transport and health sake. I am light…. 65kg but need to tow my dog in a trailer…. he is 30kg + trailer weight. Not going far …. 15 miles max but hills are steep. ( 15% in places, one at 25% for 50 metres). What optimum size of motor please. I know that 250w isn’t enough based on a friends experience. Ps… going to convert one of my mountain bikes that hasn’t been used in a good while . Many thanks

Tim Grove

Tim Grove

I’m 250lbs how much power do i need to get me around for many miles. I want and need more information on the bike. What is the website for this bike?

I’m 250lbs how much power do i need to get me around for many miles. I want and need more information on the bike. What is the website for this bike?

Marc Byrne

Marc Byrne

Not sure if this will help ay of yee, I’m 230lbs, 55, (not fit!), I converted a Dawes Galaxy AL touring bike to an e-bike, 350W, 36V, 12.5Ah. I only ever use it in pedal assist mode, as it means I still get a workout and it only kicks in on the hills, I’ve now covered over 600Kms (lcd trip computer is great), and wouldn’t change it. Never had any issues and unless you really want to be really lazy go for the bigger motors, but personally I don’t think there is any need.

Not sure if this will help ay of yee, I’m 230lbs, 55, (not fit!), I converted a Dawes Galaxy AL touring bike to an e-bike, 350W, 36V, 12.5Ah. I only ever use it in pedal assist mode, as it means I still get a workout and it only kicks in on the hills, I’ve now covered over 600Kms (lcd trip computer is great), and wouldn’t change it. Never had any issues and unless you really want to be really lazy go for the bigger motors, but personally I don’t think there is any need.

fub gumfaw

fub gumfaw

This guy is delusional! Build your bike for the power you want. I’ll never have a 500w or less bike! LAME!!!

This guy is delusional! Build your bike for the power you want. I’ll never have a 500w or less bike! LAME!!!

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

Our website has an article about the government regulations for ebikes, please find it here:
https://ebikebc.com/ebike-regulations-in-british-columbia/

Our website has an article about the government regulations for ebikes, please find it here:
https://ebikebc.com/ebike-regulations-in-british-columbia/

Ben

Ben

Planning to build a DIY e-bike…

I bought a 36V DC, 500w, current rated @ 19A with 2400 RPM.

Can I piggyback (3) 12V 7Aph batteries in parallel and directly connect them to the motor without using a controller? Also, what charger would you recommend for this battery setup? Any pros/cons with just using a switch?

Would you suggest a bigger sprocket on the motor or on the wheel? How fast will the bike go with this configuration? Thx!

Planning to build a DIY e-bike…

I bought a 36V DC, 500w, current rated @ 19A with 2400 RPM.

Can I piggyback (3) 12V 7Aph batteries in parallel and directly connect them to the motor without using a controller? Also, what charger would you recommend for this battery setup? Any pros/cons with just using a switch?

Would you suggest a bigger sprocket on the motor or on the wheel? How fast will the bike go with this configuration? Thx!

eBikeBC

eBikeBC

Answer to this requires knowing the type of motor, wheel/motor configuration and many more design parameters.

Answer to this requires knowing the type of motor, wheel/motor configuration and many more design parameters.

Rick

Rick

Fat tire 1500w kit on 26″ x 4.0/52v 32ah battery. Should be very fun. 250lbs with 75lbs of towing.

Fat tire 1500w kit on 26″ x 4.0/52v 32ah battery. Should be very fun. 250lbs with 75lbs of towing.

Peter O

Peter O

I have a 48v 12w battery controller the same …. can I use them on a 36v 750w hub motor?

I have a 48v 12w battery controller the same …. can I use them on a 36v 750w hub motor?

ebikebc Marketing

ebikebc Marketing

Please visit our contact page at this address:
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In the “How can we help?” section, select “Purchase Inquiry”.
If you answer the related questions, a technician will contact you and assist you further.

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In the “How can we help?” section, select “Purchase Inquiry”.
If you answer the related questions, a technician will contact you and assist you further.

eBikeBC Marketing

eBikeBC Marketing

The motor can work on 48V system with some limitation, you have to make sure you are not overloading the motor by applying more power.
If your controller is 36V then you will damage the controller is 48V in used.

SO PLEASE DON’T USE 36v SYSTEM ON 48V.

The motor can work on 48V system with some limitation, you have to make sure you are not overloading the motor by applying more power.
If your controller is 36V then you will damage the controller is 48V in used.

SO PLEASE DON’T USE 36v SYSTEM ON 48V.

Peter O

Peter O

Sorry I mean a 48v 12 amp battery

Sorry I mean a 48v 12 amp battery

eBikeBc

eBikeBc

750W potentially gets you to 50km/h of speed, however motor winding / battery voltage configuration should be such that be capable of this speed.

750W potentially gets you to 50km/h of speed, however motor winding / battery voltage configuration should be such that be capable of this speed.

GiLMaN

GiLMaN

I wanna build one for going to work and its a 10 min ride with car and I want little bit of speed as well
So if I choose the 750 as the middle ground its enough right?

I wanna build one for going to work and its a 10 min ride with car and I want little bit of speed as well
So if I choose the 750 as the middle ground its enough right?

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